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Highland Titles (highlandtitles.com) | Fake or Real?

Is the souvenir store Highland Titles fake or real? Read the review to know if highlandtitles.com is legit or a scam. Can you buy a Lordship?

Website Name

Highland Titles (highlandtitles.com)

Website Type

Online Souvenir Store

Is Highland Titles Fake or Real?

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Real

Why Is Highland Titles Real?

Highland Titles is a website that claims to be selling Scottish nobility titles. Many, including myself, who have come across their ads have wondered whether it is a scam. The very idea that anyone can simply buy the title of ‘Lord’ is preposterous.

highland titles facebook ad

However, it is simply a marketing gimmick by Highland Titles. The website sells gift boxes with a novelty certificate of nobility and the rights for a 1 sqft. plot of land in a Scottish nature reserve owned by the company

highland titles gifting

The company is officially registered in Scotland and is also recognized as a charitable trust. The disclaimer on the website also states that the title of nobility is only being offered for entertainment.

highland titles company information and disclaimer

The charitable trust aspect of the company seems to have been the subject of controversy in 2015. However, the issue seems to be resolved now and I could find Highland Titles Charitable Trust for Scotland listed in the Guernsey Registry, as stated on Highland Titles’ website.

  • highland titles charity controversy
  • highland trust charity registration

A domain name lookup of the website shows that it was registered on 24th August 2006 in Channel Islands, Great Britain. The company name is mentioned as Highland Titles Limited. No contact details have been provided.

whois

The domain registration date is in line with the statement on the About Us page that the company has been operational since 2007.

highland titles about us

Highland Titles has a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Pinterest. These pages were created a few years after the creation of the website, but this is understandable as social media websites didn’t gain mainstream popularity till the late 2000s/early 2010s. The Facebook page data corresponds with the information given on the website.

  • facebook page
  • twitter profile
  • youtube channel

The home page also has a gallery supposedly containing images of customers who have received their gift boxes from Highland Titles. These images are real as far as I can tell, as their brand hashtags have thousands of posts.

  • homepage gallery
  • highlandtitles hashtag instagram

The contact details given on the website include an address, a bunch of phone numbers and an email ID. All the details seem to be valid. The address could verified as being of the company’s nature reserve in Scotland, the email ID is active and the phone numbers look like they are being operated from Scotland.

  • contact details
  • highland titles nature glencoe nature reserve scotland
  • phone number

The website claims that it has a 4.8/5 rating on TrustPilot, based on 9,539 reviews. This was found to be true when checked and 90% of the reviews are 5-star, while 1% of them are 1-star. While 95 is still a significant number of negative reviews, it does not seem as if the ratings have been artificially manipulated.

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  • highland titles trustpilot rating
  • review 1
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It seems that Highland Titles is not a scam. While their advertisements seem to imply that they are actually selling lordship titles for a couple of hundred dollars, it is made apparent that it is not the case. The company owns and maintains a nature reserve in Scotland and proceeds from the purchases go towards its conservation. The website is only selling souvenir gift boxes with a novelty nobility title and the right to own 1 sqft. of land in Highland Titles’ nature reserve.

The company’s information such as registration and status as a charity seems to be legitimate. The contact details seem real too and there is nothing suspicious about the social media pages either. The website is highly-rated on TrustPilot with overwhelmingly positive reviews. Though the company’s charitable trust was the subject of some controversy in 2015, the issue no longer seems to be relevant. All the signs indicate that Highland Titles is a trustworthy website.

It should be noted that there are other companies, such as Established Titles, that seem to be running scams under the pretence of being a charity. It is advisable to do some research about the legitimacy of similar websites before making a purchase, as not all companies claiming to sell novelty Lordship titles are actually working towards conservation.

Remember: If something seems too good to be true, it probably is.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are presented as an educated opinion based on facts and evidence. There is no malicious intent or attempt to defame any individual/s or organization/s. If you are a website owner and would like to provide clarifications regarding your business and/or website, please get in touch using the Contact Form.